Keeping up to date with my research papers

Many peo­ple ask me to let them know when I write a new research paper. I can’t do that as there are too many peo­ple involved, and it is not scalable.

The solu­tion is sim­ple. Take your pick from the fol­low­ing options. Each is auto­matic and will let you know when­ever I pro­duce a new paper.

  1. Sub­scribe to the rss feed on my web­site using feedly or some other rss reader.
  2. Sub­scribe to new papers via email from feedburner.
  3. Go to my Google scholar page and click “Fol­low” at the top of the page.

The lat­ter method will work for any­one with a Google scholar page. The Google scholar option only includes research papers. The first two meth­ods also include any new sem­i­nars I give or new soft­ware pack­ages I write.

North American seminars: June 2015

For the next few weeks I am trav­el­ling in North Amer­ica and will be giv­ing the fol­low­ing talks.

The Yahoo talk will be streamed live.

I’ll post slides on my main site after each talk.

Thinking big at Yahoo

I’m speak­ing in the “Yahoo Labs Big Thinkers” series on Fri­day 26 June. I hope I can live up to the title!

My talk is on “Explor­ing the bound­aries of pre­dictabil­ity: what can we fore­cast, and when should we give up?”  Essen­tially I will start with some of the ideas in this post, and then dis­cuss the fea­tures of hard-​​to-​​forecast time series.

So if you’re in the San Fran­cisco Bay area, please come along. Oth­er­wise, it will be streamed live on the Yahoo Labs web­site. Con­tinue reading →

Statistical modelling and analysis of big data

I’m cur­rently attend­ing the one day work­shop on this topic at QUT in Bris­bane. This morn­ing I spoke on “Visu­al­iz­ing and fore­cast­ing big time series data”. My slides are here.

The talks are being streamed.

OVERVIEW

Big data is now endemic in busi­ness, indus­try, gov­ern­ment, envi­ron­men­tal man­age­ment, med­ical sci­ence, social research and so on. One of the com­men­su­rate chal­lenges is how to effec­tively model and analyse these data.

This work­shop will bring together national and inter­na­tional experts in sta­tis­ti­cal mod­el­ling and analy­sis of big data, to share their expe­ri­ences, approaches and opin­ions about future direc­tions in this field.

Connect with local employers

I keep telling stu­dents that there are lots of jobs in data sci­ence (includ­ing sta­tis­tics), and they often tell me they can’t find them adver­tised. As usual, you do have to do some net­work­ing, and one of the best ways of doing it is via a Data Sci­ence Meetup. Many cities now have them includ­ing Mel­bourne, Syd­ney, Lon­don, etc. It is the per­fect oppor­tu­nity to meet with local employ­ers, many of which are hir­ing due to the huge expan­sion in the use of data analy­sis in busi­ness (aka busi­ness analytics).

At the end of each Mel­bourne meetup, some employ­ers have been adver­tis­ing their cur­rent ana­lytic job open­ings to the audience.

Now the local orga­niz­ers are going to extend the oppor­tu­nity to allow job-​​searchers to give a 90 sec­ond pitch to employ­ers. Details are pro­vided on the mes­sage board.

Visit of Di Cook

Next week, Pro­fes­sor Di Cook from Iowa State Uni­ver­sity is vis­it­ing my research group at Monash Uni­ver­sity. Di is a world leader in data visu­al­iza­tion, and is espe­cially well-​​known for her work on inter­ac­tive graph­ics and the XGobi and GGobi soft­ware. See her book with Deb Swayne for details.

For those want­ing to hear her speak, read on. Con­tinue reading →

European talks. June-July 2014

For the next month I am trav­el­ling in Europe and will be giv­ing the fol­low­ing talks.

17 June. Chal­lenges in fore­cast­ing peak elec­tric­ity demand. Energy Forum, Sierre, Valais/​Wallis, Switzerland.

20 June. Com­mon func­tional prin­ci­pal com­po­nent mod­els for mor­tal­ity fore­cast­ing. Inter­na­tional Work­shop on Func­tional and Oper­a­to­r­ial Sta­tis­tics. Stresa, Italy.

24–25 June. Func­tional time series with appli­ca­tions in demog­ra­phy. Hum­boldt Uni­ver­sity, Berlin.

1 July. Fast com­pu­ta­tion of rec­on­ciled fore­casts in hier­ar­chi­cal and grouped time series. Inter­na­tional Sym­po­sium on Fore­cast­ing, Rot­ter­dam, Netherlands.

Creating a handout from beamer slides

I’m about to head off on a speak­ing tour to Europe (more on that in another post) and one of my hosts has asked for my pow­er­point slides so they can print them. They have made two false assump­tions: (1) that I use pow­er­point; (2) that my slides are sta­tic so they can be printed.

Instead, I pro­duced a cut-​​down ver­sion of my beamer slides, leav­ing out some of the ani­ma­tions and other fea­tures that will not print eas­ily. Then I pro­duced a pdf file with sev­eral slides per page. Con­tinue reading →