Keeping up to date with my research papers

Many peo­ple ask me to let them know when I write a new research paper. I can’t do that as there are too many peo­ple involved, and it is not scalable.

The solu­tion is sim­ple. Take your pick from the fol­low­ing options. Each is auto­matic and will let you know when­ever I pro­duce a new paper.

  1. Sub­scribe to the rss feed on my web­site using feedly or some other rss reader.
  2. Sub­scribe to new papers via email from feedburner.
  3. Go to my Google scholar page and click “Fol­low” at the top of the page.

The lat­ter method will work for any­one with a Google scholar page. The Google scholar option only includes research papers. The first two meth­ods also include any new sem­i­nars I give or new soft­ware pack­ages I write.

IJF best paper awards

Today at the Inter­na­tional Sym­po­sium on Fore­cast­ing, I announced the awards for the best paper pub­lished in the Inter­na­tional Jour­nal of Fore­cast­ing in the period 2012–2013.

We make an award every two years to the best paper(s) pub­lished in the jour­nal. There is always about 18 months delay after the pub­li­ca­tion period to allow time for reflec­tion, cita­tions, etc. The selected papers are selected by vote of the edi­to­r­ial board. The best paper wins an engraved bronze plaque and US$1000. Any other awards are in the form of cer­tifi­cates. Con­tinue reading →

Paperpile makes me more productive

One of the first things I tell my new research stu­dents is to use a ref­er­ence man­age­ment sys­tem to help them keep track of the papers they read, and to assist in cre­at­ing bib files for their bib­li­og­ra­phy. Most of them use Mende­ley, one or two use Zotero. Both do a good job and both are free.

I use nei­ther. I did use Mende­ley for sev­eral years (and blogged about it a few years ago), but it became slower and slower to sync as my ref­er­ence col­lec­tion grew. Even­tu­ally it sim­ply couldn’t han­dle the load. I have over 11,000 papers in my col­lec­tion of papers, and I was spend­ing sev­eral min­utes every day wait­ing for Mende­ley just to update the database.

Then I came across Paper­pile, which is not so well known as some of its com­peti­tors, but it is truly awe­some. I’ve now been using it for over a year, and I have grown to depend on it every day to keep track of all the papers I read, and to cre­ate my bib files. Con­tinue reading →

What to cite?

This ques­tion comes from a com­ment on another post:

I’ve seen authors cit­ing as many ref­er­ences as pos­si­ble to try to please poten­tial ref­er­ees. Many of those ref­er­ences are low qual­ity papers though. Any gen­eral guid­ance about a typ­i­cal length for the ref­er­ence section?

It depends on the sub­ject and style of the paper. I’ve writ­ten a paper with over 900 cita­tions, but that was a review of time series fore­cast­ing over a 25 year period, and so it had to include a lot of references.

I’ve also writ­ten a paper with just four cita­tions. As it was a com­men­tary, it did not need a lot of con­tex­tual information.

Rather than pro­vide guid­ance on the length of the ref­er­ence sec­tion, I think it is bet­ter to fol­low some gen­eral prin­ci­ples of cita­tion in research. Con­tinue reading →

Nominations for best International Journal of Forecasting paper, 2012-2013

Every two years, the Inter­na­tional Jour­nal of Fore­cast­ing awards a prize for the best paper pub­lished in a two year period. It is now time to iden­tify the best paper pub­lished in the IJF dur­ing 2012 and 2013. There is always about 18 months delay after the pub­li­ca­tion period to allow time for reflec­tion, cita­tions, etc. The prize is US$1000 plus an engraved plaque. Con­tinue reading →

IJF review papers

Review papers are extremely use­ful for new researchers such as PhD stu­dents, or when you want to learn about a new research field. The Inter­na­tional Jour­nal of Fore­cast­ing pro­duced a whole review issue in 2006, and it con­tains some of the most highly cited papers we have ever pub­lished. Now, begin­ning with the lat­est issue of the jour­nal, we have started pub­lish­ing occa­sional review arti­cles on selected areas of fore­cast­ing. The first two arti­cles are:

  1. Elec­tric­ity price fore­cast­ing: A review of the state-​​of-​​the-​​art with a look into the future by Rafał Weron.
  2. The chal­lenges of pre-​​launch fore­cast­ing of adop­tion time series for new durable prod­ucts by Paul Good­win, Sheik Meeran, and Karima Dyussekeneva.

Both tackle very impor­tant top­ics in fore­cast­ing. Weron’s paper con­tains a com­pre­hen­sive sur­vey of work on elec­tric­ity price fore­cast­ing, coher­ently bring­ing together a large body of diverse research — I think it is the longest paper I have ever approved at 50 pages. Good­win, Meeran and Dyussekeneva review research on new prod­uct fore­cast­ing, a prob­lem every com­pany that pro­duces goods or ser­vices has faced; when there are no his­tor­i­cal data avail­able, how do you fore­cast the sales of your product?

We have a few other review papers in progress, so keep an eye out for them in future issues.


biblatex for statisticians

I am now using bibla­tex for all my bib­li­o­graphic work as it seems to have devel­oped enough to be sta­ble and reli­able. The big advan­tage of bibla­tex is that it is easy to for­mat the bib­li­og­ra­phy to con­form to spe­cific jour­nal or pub­lisher styles. It is also pos­si­ble to have struc­tured bib­li­ogra­phies (e.g., divided into sec­tions: books, papers, R pack­ages, etc.) Con­tinue reading →

Varian on big data

Last week my research group dis­cussed Hal Varian’s inter­est­ing new paper on “Big data: new tricks for econo­met­rics”, Jour­nal of Eco­nomic Per­spec­tives, 28(2): 3–28.

It’s a nice intro­duc­tion to trees, bag­ging and forests, plus a very brief entrée to the LASSO and the elas­tic net, and to slab and spike regres­sion. Not enough to be able to use them, but ok if you’ve no idea what they are. Con­tinue reading →